Saturday, January 16, 2010

Tibetan Earthquake Protection Amulet



We published this once before, but all things being equal, this might be a good time to publish it again. Click on the image to download a larger image, then print it out and paste it over doors and windows. I suppose you could carry it on your person, but to my limited knowledge that is not precisely how it was originally intended.

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11 reader comments:

Mala said...

I did it. I hope it works and protects me from earthquake if there is one in Texas.

Greg Johnson said...

If I'm not mistaken, I believe the guru pictured is Thantong Gyalpo, the great stupa and bridge builder, who also created Tibetan Opera and who attained enlightenment by meditating on Chenrezig. See his Sadhana "All Pervading Benefit of beings: The Meditation and Recitation of the Great Compassionate One (ISBN-10: 1559392061)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thang_Tong_Gyalpo

TENPA said...

You are quite correct.

VH Frater ID said...

This is truly beautiful. Would you consider translating or explaining the words that are on this talisman for those, like me, who can't read it?

VH Frater ID said...

I'm actually strongly considering making a talisman based upon the symbolism, but translating into symbolism more suited for a western mind. If you would be willing to help me decipher the symbolism contained within your talisman, I would do my best to make this more accessible to those who find this too foreign.

Can you tell me what figure is depicted upon the lotus, and what the prayer is written around the disc?

TENPA said...

Sorry... can't roll that way. It is what it is.

Can explain, but can't participate in exploitation, adulteration, or any other aspect of Western salad bowl spirituality.

VH Frater ID said...

I don't understand how anything I've said has anything to do with exploitation or adulteration.

Anonymous said...

Has it ever occurred to you that perhaps there is a message in that very symbolism?

'Living, multivalent myth remains the most effective protection and treatment we have when our affect images slip and fall, providing us with wholesome conceptual nutrition, and inoculating us effectively against the ideo-pathogens which are ever-present in today's environment. Wise use of the traditions we have inherited from our forebears could provide us with these images, but the current Western world view is too rigid, and our iconoclasm too institutionalized, to admit of such possibilities. Even in those realms of modern study, such as the psychology of archetypes, where myths are still admitted, they are often welcomed only after they have been objectified into powerlessness. Gone from our world view is myth's ability to penetrate into the real, indescribable nature of things; missing is that state of myth-induced being which is living wisdom. In opening ourselves to the modern, we have closed ourselves to the ancient, and until a hole is cut in this wall we will remain immured outside ourselves, sequestered away from the durable continuity of that vision of Reality that those who came before us toiled so sedulously to bequeath to us intact.'

Have a read: The Greatness of Saturn - Svoboda

VH Frater ID said...

I'm certain there is a message in that very symbolism. However, if a person is speaking Greek to a person that only speaks English, Spanish, and Hebrew, the message is lost. The same which applies to language also applies to foreign symbolism.

Greg Johnson said...

Inspired by your post, I decided to write a bit about Thangtong Gyalpo on my blog as well:

http://imaginaryofferings.blogspot.com/

TENPA said...

Well, we'll post it just this once... but then you absolutely, positively have to stop "slogging through ngondro," because I believe you will find that the more one practices the Longchen Nyingtik ngondro, the less slogging there is. It actually becomes quite joyous, and directly you finish, you want to start all over again. In fact, it could be rather successfully argued that it is never "finished" per se, but becomes the occupation of many lifetimes.

Well, it sure beats the bowling alley.

Best wishes to you. I really like your blog title.